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Things to Do in Sydney - page 3

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Garden Island
6 Tours and Activities

When Sydney’s original European settlers arrived in Sydney Harbor, they sustained themselves by planting a garden here at Garden Island. Today, after land was reclaimed and filled in with rocks, Garden Island is now a point that juts out into the harbor, and houses the Royal Australian Navy’s eastern fleet of ships. During World War II, a Japanese mini sub infiltrated the harbor and sank an Australian ship—resulting in the death of 21 sailors from the Australian and British navies. Much more history is outlined in depth at the Royal Australian Navy Heritage Center—a fascinating museum here on Pott’s Point that’s a must for history or war buffs. Once finished perusing the Heritage Center, which is fantastically free of charge, take a stroll through the gardens and grounds that are hidden behind the museum, where BBQ grills and views of the harbor make the perfect spot for a picnic.

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Parliament House
4 Tours and Activities

The oldest building in Sydney, Parliament House is home to the political reigning body of New South Wales. Both the Legislative Assembly and Legislative Council gather inside what once served as Sydney Hospital to make important decisions about the state’s operations. While ghosts are rumored to roam the building’s halls, visitors most often come to learn about its rich history and gain a better understanding of Sydney’s modern political operations.

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Pylon Lookout
3 Tours and Activities

In addition to the Bridge Climb, there is a cheap alternative to get the famous view from the top of town on the Sydney Harbour Bridge–the Pylon Lookout. The bridge walkway leads to the South East Pylon and to the entrance of the lookout, from where 200 steps lead up to the viewing platform located 285 feet above sea level.

From here enjoy fantastic panorama views of the Opera House, Circular Quay and the two arches of the Harbour Bridge. You'll also be able to observe the daring bridge climbers. The Pylon Lookout doesn't only consist of the viewing platform though, but is made up of three levels of exhibits. A visit to the small museum located inside the Pylon is included in an admission ticket and includes information about the history and construction of the bridge, including the dangerous working conditions of the riveters, stonemasons and riggers who constructed it. Hear incredible stories, such as the tale of a worker who survived a fall from the bridge.

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Shark Island
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Now named for its shape and the image it brings to mind, Shark Island was once referred to as “Boambilly” by Australia’s aboriginal people. The island was previously the site of an animal quarantine and naval depot, but today travelers flock to its shores for recreation.

Settle in under shady trees and enjoy one of the island’s many well-kept picnic sites, or explore the rocky passes and handmade grottos along Shark Island’s beaches.

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Pitt Street Mall
3 Tours and Activities

A pedestrian area of downtown Sydney, the Pitt Street Mall offers some of the most exciting shopping in the city. In the area of just one block lies several flagship stores and more than 500 retail spaces, housed in some of the most expensive commercial real estate in Australia. Specialty stores to suit all tastes can be found in the seven shopping centers, including The Strand Arcade, Westfield Sydney, Myer, and David Jones. Many of the centers were refurbished as recently as 2011. Shops vary from couture and classic fashion, to budget chain stores, electronics, and the latest in athletic wear. A visit here will certainly include some of the best shopping in Sydney, along with the bustling activity of this urban center. A footbridge runs across the mall, providing ample opportunities to take in the sights of people passing by. Restaurants and cafes provide replenishment from all the action.

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Newtown
4 Tours and Activities
Forget the urban, corporate bustle of Sydney’s CBD, and escape to the artsy, brick alleyways of the nearby Newtown suburb. Once a rough and tumble area to the south of downtown Sydney, the gentrified suburb has been completely revitalized as an outpost of foodies and shoppers. When walking the streets of funky Newtown—which are often speckled with graffiti—browse through trendy shopping boutiques or hip little corner cafés. Enjoy live music at the dozens of pubs and theaters scattered across town, and absorb the eclectic, creative vibes of this bohemian Sydney suburb. On King Street, vintage bookshops and music stores ironically sit next to antique shops, and the alternative, grunge, counterculture collective makes for some of the city’s best people watching. From here, it’s only a short drive to Sydney’s beaches or the lights of Darling Harbor, but given Newtown’s creative grit and casual sense of refinement, there’s an indie sense of disconnect from the Sydney most travelers know.
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Camp Cove
2 Tours and Activities

Camp Cove is a small golden beach popular with swimmers and families. As the turquoise bay is for the most part protected from surf and winds, it is often completely calm. Often less crowded than other nearby Sydney beaches, it is considered a bit of hidden gem by locals. Indigenous rock carvings made by Aboriginals of whales and fish can still be viewed on the rocks lining the beach. Officers of the First Fleet frequently visited Camp Cove as well.

Just sitting on the beach allows for a great vantage point of the surrounding sea and Sydney skyline. Boats docked just off shore dot the coastline. Furthermore, the calm conditions provide an opportunity to easily view the natural wildlife. Fishing, kayaking, snorkeling, and scuba diving from the shore is common.

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The Star Sydney
2 Tours and Activities

The Star Sydney Casino and Hotel on Darling Harbour is one of Sydney’s premier entertainment precincts. Hosting two gaming floors, seven restaurants and eight bars, the Star Casino is the second largest casino in Australia.

You’d be forgiven for calling The Star by another name. Formerly known as both Star City Casino and the Sydney Harbour Casino, it’s not uncommon for visitors to think the three are different places. The Star Casino features two gaming floors. The main gaming floor on level one is the one you’ll see if you’re visiting the Casino on a casual basis. The Sovereign Room is the VIP gaming floor, with heavily restricted access. Aside from the gaming tables, the Star Casino also features a number of bars including a 24/7 sports bar, the Cherry cocktail bar, sexy Sokyo Lounge, and Rock Lily which often hosts live music. 5-7pm Monday – Friday is happy hour at casino and all of the bars mentioned offer $5 beer, wine and spirits.

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Powerhouse Museum
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3 Tours and Activities

Since 1879, the Powerhouse Museum has served as the main attraction for Sydney’s Museum of Applied Arts and Sciences. Its impressive halls are filled with all things technological—from science to communication, transport to computers—even massive steam engines! Jam-packed with more than 400,000 artifacts, this Sydney staple has become a destination for train lovers, engineers, computer nerds, scientists and the curious. While the permanent collection is pretty incredible on its own, popular temporary exhibitions, such as those that have showcased Star Trek, the Lord of the Rings, Faberge and even singer Kylie Minogue, keep this classic museum contemporary and up to date.

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More Things to Do in Sydney

Bradleys Head

Bradleys Head

2 Tours and Activities

Extending out of Sydney Harbour’s north shore, Bradleys Head overlooks many of the sights of Sydney, and visitors flock here for views of the Sydney Opera House, the Sydney Harbour Bridge, and Fort Denison. Many will come and linger with a picnic or a fishing spot, or take off on one of the many hiking trails. The popular Bradleys Head to Chowder Bay walk grants even better views of the bay, with the option to continue a longer walk onto the Split Bridge track.,

The mast of the HMAS Sydney, a ship of the Royal Australian Navy that fought naval battles in World War I, is mounted on the headland as a memorial. Cannons left over from past defenses still stand, and the Athol Hall that once served soldiers their meals now operates as a modern cafe. Bradleys Head is part of the Sydney Harbour National Park, and offers a new perspective of the city.

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Garrison Church

Garrison Church

1 Tour and Activity

Humble, proud, and unpretentious, Garrison Church isn’t the largest church in Sydney—nor its most popular or famous—but it holds an honorable, timeless charm for Sydney’s military families. Established back in 1840, Garrison Church was the first military church established in the colony of Australia, and today houses a military museum on the small inside of the church. As it’s located next to The Rocks near downtown, Garrison Church makes an easy detour on a popular visitor route of Sydney, and is a way to experience a sliver of life in Australia’s earliest days. The church itself was actually constructed from the sandstone on nearby Argyle Street, and while modern Sydney has grown up around it into the modern metropolis it is today, Garrison Church exists as an almost forgotten window into the past.

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Nurses Walk

Nurses Walk

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Cockle Bay Wharf

Cockle Bay Wharf

1 Tour and Activity

Hungry travelers looking to experience Sydney’s impressive shorefront need look no further than Cockle Bay Wharf. This culinary destination offers visitors easy access to plenty of restaurants with a wide-range of options, from fresh seafood and Italian fare to traditional Australian cuisine. And while there’s plenty to sink your teeth into during the mealtime hours, it’s the late-night scene that draws spirited travelers to the shores of this famous bay. Nightclubs, cocktail bars and speakeasies offer visitors the chance to dance the night away while sipping strong drinks and listening to contemporary tunes in one of Sydney’s most iconic destinations.

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Justice and Police Museum

Justice and Police Museum

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Hands up! Housed in a historic building that served as a police office and court from 1856 to 1888, the Justice and Police Museum now shows the judicial and criminal history of New South Wales. This chilling subject is reflected in the interior design: spiked gates, narrow door frames, winding staircases and a fairly scary cell block are all among the main features of the building. Here, you can step into the dark side of Sydney’s past and see an impressive collection of murder weapons, a gallery of defendant mug shots and learn about the stories left behind by judges, officers, thugs and crooks.

In the 1850s, the convict transport to New South Wales had just ended, but crime was on the rise and the cases were notorious. Innocent or guilty, rough criminals or simply unlucky people—they all passed through this building, and law and order was maintained.

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Capitol Theatre

Capitol Theatre

These days Sydney’s Capitol Theatre is regarded as one of the finest theaters in the country, but this wasn’t always the case. The site on which the theater now stands has over 100 years of history.

Located in the historic Haymarket district, the Capitol Theater began its life in 1892 as the Belmore Markets, which closed in 1916. The building was then converted into a hippodrome designed for the Wirth Bros circus. Within ten years the circus became financially unviable and the building was again converted, this time into a movie theatre. Its manifestation as a ‘picture palace’ lasted until the 1980s, when is was scheduled to be demolished. Luckily, a Heritage Council conservation order rescued the theatre and it was eventually restored to create the world-class lyric theatre that is today.

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Susannah Place Museum

Susannah Place Museum

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At the foot of Sydney’s Harbour Bridge lies the city’s historic birthplace, the Rocks: a quarter of winding streets, small sandstone houses and some of the oldest pubs in town. It was here that the colonists from the First Fleet settled, and the site soon became home to the strong community network of Sydney’s working class.

The Susannah Place Museum, a small complex dating back to 1844, tells the story of these former residents. It consists of four terrace houses and a mom-and-pop shop that sells historical artifacts and typical Australian souvenirs. The museum gives fascinating insight into the hard urban life of the working class during colonial times, with workers' stories reconstructed through oral histories. Visitors are shown a documentary about those who lived here and are then given a tour through the buildings, which are all preserved in their original condition.

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Strand Arcade

Strand Arcade

1 Tour and Activity

Located in the heart of Sydney’s Central Business District, between George Street and the Pitt Street Mall, the Strand Arcade is a Victorian-style shopping center that houses specialty stores catering to a sophisticated clientele, as well as Australian designer labels such as Alannah Hill, Alex Perry, Jayson Brunsdon and Fleur Wood.

The Strand, which is named after a shopping street in London that was famous in the early 1900s, was designed by the English architect John Spencer and opened in 1892. It was the fifth and last shopping arcade built in Sydney during the Victorian era, and is the only one remaining in its original form.

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Botany Bay

Botany Bay

Botany Bay is a central port of Sydney, significant both in historic and modern times. In 1770, it was the landing spot of Captain James Cook when he first stepped onto Australia after having explored New Zealand extensively. The bay was named for the botanical species found by a naturalist on board his ship. French explorers turned up in 1788, days after the First Fleet had arrived in Australia. The heritage-listed spot is now home to a monument marking the meeting of European and Aboriginal cultures here.

Today Botany Bay serves as the site of both Sydney’s major cargo port, Port Botany, as well as two runways of the Sydney airport. To the north and south, Botany Bay National Park sits on La Perouse and Kurnell headlands. This area offers hiking, scuba diving, snorkeling, walking tracks, picnic areas, and scenic lookouts out over the bay.

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Sydney Conservatorium of Music

Sydney Conservatorium of Music

The Sydney Conservatorium of Music may very well be the most respected music school in all of Australia. With faculty from the University of Sydney, it was once the site of Australia’s first full orchestra composed of both professionals and students. Today the Conservatorium provides musical education, research, and some of the city’s top performances. Its music library is the largest in the southern hemisphere.

The space itself has a remarkable place in Australian national history. Built on what was once Aboriginal land, it then evolved into an early settlement built with sandstone and supported by labor from convicts. It also served as government stables, remnants of which can still be seen in the architecture today. The historic land turned international music school makes for an interesting visit, with part of the school located underneath the Sydney Royal Botanic Gardens.

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BridgeClimb Sydney

BridgeClimb Sydney

The Sydney BridgeClimb is a memorable way to mark your visit to Sydney and Australia. Taking you up and over the huge arch of iconic Sydney Harbour Bridge, you can gaze out over the city and spectacular Sydney Harbour from 134 meters (440 feet) above the water. Described by those who have done it as “incredible” and an absolute “must-do,” the climb is the ultimate adrenaline fuelled way to see Sydney. There are three guided climbs that you can choose from: The Express, The Discovery and The Bridge Climb that all take you to the summit of the Bridge via different routes. The Express Climb is a smaller group tour (up to 12 climbers), with fewer stops on the Bridge, that allows you to explore its length in just over two hours. The Discovery Climb takes three and a half hours and is a chance to explore the heart of the bridge and learn more about its history and engineering.
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Tall Ship James Craig

Tall Ship James Craig

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To say the James Craig has had a lengthy history would be a bit of an understatement. Its restoration process took 40 years, and before that it spent 40 years washed up on a Tasmanian beach. Despite that 80-year period, however, when the ship was incapacitated, the James Craig still spent 56 years of sailing out on the seas, rounding Cape Horn 23 times and serving her country in World War I when stationed up in New Guinea. Today, after all that hard work restoring the ship and saving it from the sand, she’s the Southern Hemisphere’s only 19th century tall ship that’s fully operational, regularly taking passengers for cruises out on Sydney Harbor and beyond. In total, the ship has 21 different sails and over 140 lines, and for an added fee you can scale the mast and experience swaying nearly 35 feet above the heaving decks. While enjoying a cruise on the James Craig, take in views of Sydney sights as you make your way out to the Heads, and feel the wind rushing through your hair.

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Blue Mountains

Blue Mountains

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Almost on the edge of Sydney, and visible on a clear day from the city's observation towers, the beautiful World Heritage-listed Blue Mountains are the perfect destination for an idyllic day trip from the hustle-bustle of downtown Sydney. The Blue Mountains offer the stunning scenery of rugged sandstone outcrops, cavernous valleys and towering eucalyptus forests.

Take advantage of Scenic World's cable cars and tramways to see the best of the Blue Mountains, including the Three Sisters rock formation. Glide between cliff tops and over the rainforest on the Scenic Skyway tram; descend into the Jamison Valley on the Scenic Railway; explore the rainforest along the Scenic Walkway and climb back to the top with unbeatable views on the Scenic Cableway.

The area offers scenic drives, manicured gardens, shopping and pampering at spas and luxurious accommodations. Other attractions include the Zig Zag Railway, Norman Lindsay Gallery at Springwood and the Jenolan Caves.

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