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Things to Do in Tokyo - page 3

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13 Tours and Activities
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Engaku-ji Temple
12 Tours and Activities

Engaku-Ji Temple is a nearly perfect example of Zen Buddhist architecture. Located in the city of Kamakura, to the south of Tokyo, it is one of the most important temple complexes in Japan and ranked second among Kamakura's Five Mountains, or monasteries.

The temple was founded in 1282 by a Chinese Zen monk and has withstood numerous fires and other rials over the last 750 years. It's the oldest example of Tang Chinese architecture left in Japan. The most prominent features are the 16th century reliquary hall, which claims to house one of the Buddha's teeth, and a huge 14th century temple bell. Engaku-ji is prettiest to visit in Autumn when the vibrant fall foliage accentuates its minimalist lines. Inside the park area are numerous tea houses, restaurants and gardens.

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Hanazono Shrine (Hanazono Jinja)
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12 Tours and Activities

Tokyo’s Hanazono Jinja Shrine is famous for its open-air antique market that is held on Sundays throughout the year. Antique markets have been held on shrine grounds for centuries. Hanazono’s market is famous for its deals on traditional kimonos, used books, art prints, and hanging scroll art, along with various antiques. In addition to the antiques market, the shrine is famous for two annual festivals. Tori-no-Ichi festival is held every November and is known for its varied and extensive comedy performances. The Bon Orodri Festival is held every August and allows guests to participate in traditional Bon dancing.

Established in the mid-17th century, Hanazono Jinja Shrine is one of Tokyo’s most historic and important Shinto shrines. Over the last several hundred years it has been damaged extensively in multiple fires, the worst of which occurred during World War II. To repair the damage, it has undergone multiple renovations and rebuilds.

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Tokyo Metropolitan Government Office (TMG)
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The Tokyo Metropolitan Government Office, more commonly known as Tokyo City Hall or Tochō, is one of the most distinctive and famous buildings in the Tokyo skyline. Tokyo is a huge city and their governmental offices are huge too, taking up three city blocks with three immense buildings.

The tallest is Tokyo Metropolitan Main Building No. 1, built to resemble both a computer chip and a gothic cathedral. It splits at level 33 into two twin towers which stretch to a height 48 stories, making it the tallest building in the city for many years.

Both towers have observation decks free to the public on level 45, 202 meters high. On really clear days, you might even spot Mt Fuji to the west. The view from the southern tower is considered slightly better but the northern tower remains open later, making it more suitable for night viewing.

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Hakone Komagatake Ropeway (Komagatake Ropeway Line)
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See the so-called Nagano Alps from Japan's highest aerial tramway, the Komogatake Ropeway. The Ropeway opened in 1963 and is a popular way to take in one of the most stunning, scenic views in Japan. The Ropeway runs from the edge of Lake Ashi to the summit of Mount Komagatake, its namesake. The ropeway carries passengers 950 meters (3,116 feet), making it the highest vertical aerial tramway in the country. The ride soars through the clouds to provide views of Japan's highest mountain - Mt. Fuji, as well as the seven Izu Islands, Lake Ashinoko, and expansive coastline.

At Mt. Komogatake's summit, passengers off-load to a woodland area with a small shrine and numerous hiking trails to explore. Since the panoramic views are the highlight, it's recommended to only ride the Ropeway on clear days when the mountain summits can be spotted from the ground.

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National Museum of Emerging Science and Innovation (Miraikan)
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This shiny metal building in the Odaiba District is also known as the “Future Museum.” The National Museum of Emerging Science and Innovation is a great place to explore Tokyo's high-tech side and a fun excursion for both kids and adults.

Exhibits are based around four major themes: "Global Environment and Frontiers", "Technological Innovations and the Future", "Information Sciences and Technologies for Society" and "Life Science and Humans." All exhibits are explained in Japanese as well as English and volunteer staff answer questions and conduct scientific demonstrations.

A large area is dedicated to earthquakes, a huge issue in Japan, and here you can watch real time seismometers across the country vibrating. An enormous Geo-cosmos globe shows global weather patterns as they happen. The most popular exhibit however is ASIMO, a humanoid robot created by Honda who can walk, run and interact with humans.

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Nezu Museum (Nezu Bijutsukan)
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Opened in 1940, this incredible museum located in the heart of Tokyo is home to an impressive collection of Japanese, Chinese and Korean art. Hundreds of antiques line the gallery halls—a sample of the even more expansive collection, which is combed through for monthly shifts in public art displays.

In addition to the rich artistic history of these Asian artifcats, travelers can explore the stone paths of the well-manicured grounds outside the galleries, where teahouses, sculptures and a glass-walled café designed by Kuma Kengo round out the museum experience.

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Fuji Five Lakes (Fujigoko)
6 Tours and Activities

The Fuji Five Lakes are a group of lakes situated at the northern base of the majestic Mount Fuji, around 100 kilometers west of Tokyo. These lakes are Lake Motosu, Lake Shoji, Lake Sai, Lake Kawaguchi, and Lake Yamanaka. Along with its incredible scenery, the area offers ample opportunities for hiking, camping, and fishing. It also features hot springs, museums, and even one of Japan's largest and most popular amusement parks, Fuji-Q Highland. Lake Kawaguchi is easily accessed and offers a wealth of things for visitors to see and do. It’s also a great starting point for climbing Mount Fuji for those inclined to do so, and also popular with Tokyo locals escaping the heat and pace of the city, particularly during the summer. The largest lake is Yamanaka, while perhaps the most picturesque is the horseshoe-shaped Shōji. Elsewhere, Sai and Motosu are great spots to set up camp and enjoy water-based activities such as boating and fishing.

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More Things to Do in Tokyo

Tokyo Midtown

Tokyo Midtown

5 Tours and Activities

Located on the former site of the Ministry of Defense in Roppongi, Tokyo Midtown opened in 2007 as a multi-use entertainment district complete with apartments, office space, restaurants, shops, museums and park space. Tokyo Midtown comprises six different towers. The luxurious Ritz Carlton Tokyo occupies the top floors of Midtown Tower, while the Galleria building houses a four-floor shopping complex and the Suntory Museum of Art. The complex is also notably home to 21_21 Design Sight, a design gallery and workshop space created by architect Tadao Ando and designer Issey Miyake.

Tokyo Midtown also features two green spaces. Hinokicho Park, a former Edo-era private garden, is now a Japanese-style garden open to the public. Neighboring Midtown Garden is a popular picnicking spot, especially in late March and early April when its cherry blossoms are in bloom.

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Edo-Tokyo Open Air Architectural Museum

Edo-Tokyo Open Air Architectural Museum

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Even if you don't have a burning interest in Japanese architecture this open air museum of restored Meiji period buildings is a fun and offbeat way to spend an afternoon.

The buildings, spread out over many acres of parkland, are all authentic historical buildings either relocated or reconstructed from various places in Japan. This is one of the only places to see buildings of this style as most have been destroyed by redevelopment and earthquakes. There are middle class homes, bathhouses, working shops and restaurants, even the former residence of a prime minister. It's possible to explore both the inside and outside of many of the buildings, which are full of historical artifacts. The effect is surreal. Film buffs may find some of the buildings look familiar; Hayao Miyazaki visited here for inspiration when making the famous film Spirited Away.

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Kagurazaka

Kagurazaka

7 Tours and Activities

Trendy shopping district Kagurazaka combines tradition with modern flair. The cobbled streets and original Edo and Meiji-era structures elicit nostalgic for the past, while fashionable vendors and modernized storefronts root the neighborhood firmly in the present. Kagurazaka is known as Tokyo’s French Quarter for the its concentrated French presence due to its proximity to two French schools. French cafes line the cobblestoned street.

In the Edo Period, Kagurazaka began at the outer edge of Edo Castle’s moat. This prime location ensured an upscale clientele in the entertainment district. The neighborhood was known primarily for its numerous geisha houses, some of which still exist today. Kagurazaka in modern times retains much of its old charm. Today, most of Kagurazaka’s business is in dining and shopping. It hosts the annual Kagurazaka Awa Odori Festival in July, which is famous for traditional dance and music.

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Tokyo DisneySea®

Tokyo DisneySea®

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Ghibli Museum

Ghibli Museum

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The Studio Ghibli Museum houses art and animation from the world-class Hayao Miyazaki's Studio Ghibli, which produced the films Spirited Away, Princess Mononoke, and Howl’s Moving Castle. With stand-out architecture, wonderful film showings, and great exhibits with stunning animation, this museum is a feast for the eyes.

Outside, a giant robot statue guards the Studio Ghibli Museum. The overall design of the museum is quirky and other-worldly, so that you feel like you are actually walking through an animated set.

The first floor of the museum houses its permanent collection and examines the history and culture of animation. The second floor has special exhibitions and films, showing both the work of Miyazaki and other celebrated animated films, like Toy Story and Wallace and Gromit.

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Tokyo One Piece Tower

Tokyo One Piece Tower

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Tsukishima Monja Street

Tsukishima Monja Street

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Monjya Street is situated on the man-made island of Tsukishima and is the main hub for monjayaki restaurants in Tokyo. Here, over 70 of these restaurants jostle for attention, coming up with unique flavors for their monjayaki (a type of crispy pancake with various savory fillings). The monjayaki is served uncooked in most cases, and hungry diners must first cook their food using a grill at their table before enjoying the fruits of their labor.

Some of the restaurants only specialize in monjayaki, while others also sell other food items, such as yakisoba. Aside from the food, Tsukishima has some beautiful scenery and is a fascinating mix of the ancient and the modern, making it one of Tokyo’s most interesting neighborhoods.

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Toshogu Shrine (Nikko Toshogu)

Toshogu Shrine (Nikko Toshogu)

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Built in 1617 to deify Ieyasu Tokugawa, founder of the Tokugawa Shogunate - the family that ruled Japan for over 250 years until 1868, the Toshogu Shrine differentiates itself from other Shinto Shrines with a wide palette of colors and lavish decorations. An impressive amount of gold leaf adorns the ornate structure. Sculptures - such as the "see no evil, hear no evil, speak no evil" monkeys greet visitors. It's believed that Toshogu, situated within an easy day trip of Tokyo, protects the capital and its people.

The shrine complex consists of more than a dozen religious buildings set within a forest of some 15,000 Japanese cypress trees planted in the 17th century. Made famous by the 300 carvings of mythical and symbolic beasts, such as dragons, giraffes, and lions, Toshogu is a designated UNESCO World Heritage Site and one of Japan's most important and sacred destinations.

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National Art Center Tokyo (NACT)

National Art Center Tokyo (NACT)

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Like much of the Roppongi neighborhood, the National Art Center is sleek and innovative. The museum, designed by Kisho Kurokawa was designed to look like a melting iceberg with waving blue glass walls.

This center is unique among Tokyo art museums in that, instead of maintaining a permanent collection, it is a revolving door venue for art exhibitions from around the world. It has the largest exhibition space of any museum in Japan and can hold up to ten exhibitions at a time although it's usually not completely full.

While some of the shows require admission there are usually a few free exhibitions at any given time. The building itself is worth exploring for its sleek architecture, public spaces and restaurants perched high on wooden pedestals. Check their website for a rundown of what's currently showing.

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Mori Art Museum (Mori Bijutsukan)

Mori Art Museum (Mori Bijutsukan)

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Located atop Mori Tower in Roppongi Hills, Mori Art Museum opened in 2003 as a place to showcase contemporary art and architecture. Unlike most museums, Mori Art Museum doesn’t maintain a permanent collection. Instead visitors enjoy a rotating calendar of temporary exhibitions highlighting some of the biggest names in contemporary art from Japan and abroad. Notable artists featured in the museum in the past include Tokujin Yoshioka, Ai Weiwei and Bill Viola.

Entrance to the museum includes access to Tokyo City View, an observation deck on the 53rd floor of Mori Tower with near 360 degree views of Tokyo below. Those who prefer their views al fresco can pay an extra fee to go up to the Sky Deck one floor up.

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Chidorigafuchi Moat

Chidorigafuchi Moat

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During springtime, the parks and green spaces in Tokyo and around Japan come to life with colorful pink blossoms. Springtime is cherry blossom season, and for the best viewing in the city, head to Chidorigafuchi. With walkways, bridges, pavilions and boats plying the waters of the surrounding moat, there are plenty of places to view the spectacle in April when the sakura cherry trees bloom.

Located along the edge of the Imperial Palace moat, Chidorigafuchi is also home to a National Cemetery where the remains of the thousands of unknown Japanese soldiers who died in World War II were laid to rest. Early April typically represents the peak of cherry blossom season, but in the days and weeks following, it often appears to be snowing as the trees begin to drop their blossoms. Even if you can’t make it during springtime, the park makes for a pleasant green escape from the city throughout the year.

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Kitanomaru Park (Kitanomaru Koen)

Kitanomaru Park (Kitanomaru Koen)

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Located just north of the Imperial Palace grounds in Tokyo, Kitanomaru Park was once the site of the northernmost section of Edo Castle, where members of the Tokugawa clan lived. In 1969 in celebration of Emperor Showa’s 60th birthday, the area was opened to the public as a woodland park.

Today, Kitanomaru Park is home to the Science Museum, National Museum of Modern Art and Nippon Budokan indoor arena, as well as two castle gates now designated as national important cultural assets. Tayasu-mon gate at the northern end of the park was erected in 1636, making it the oldest gate remaining in the Edo Castle complex. In springtime, the 330 trees lining the castle moat passing through the park burst with cherry blossoms; it’s one of Tokyo’s most popular sites for hanami, the Japanese custom of enjoying the annual blossom display.

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